Strokes Gained: Lowry's Prowess on Oakmont's Greens

Shane Lowry's putting is a big reason why he enters the final round with a four-stroke lead. (USGA/Darren Carroll)
Shane Lowry's putting is a big reason why he enters the final round with a four-stroke lead. (USGA/Darren Carroll)

Shane Lowry of Ireland surged into the lead by recording a third-round 65, tied for the lowest score of the championship. Lowry holds a four-stroke lead over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry entering this afternoon’s final round.
Lowry’s place atop the leader board was powered by his putting and short game. His putting contributed 41 percent of his total gain on the field, and his short game (off-green shots inside 100 yards) contributed another 36 percent. “My putter feels good in my hands,” he said.
Dustin Johnson is in a tie for second place headed into the final round. He did this on the strength of his championship-leading driving, which contributed 53 percent of his total gain. Johnson was ranked No. 24 in strokes gained putting out of 67 players who made the cut. “It's tough to make putts. I feel like I'm hitting my putts on my line with the correct speed. So, I mean, at some point, they will start to go in.”
U.S. Open Through Three Rounds: 

 Strokes gained per round (ranks in parentheses)
PlayerPositionDriveApprShortPutt
Shane Lowry1 0.7 (22)   0.6 (28)   2.0 (1)   2.3 (2)  
Dustin JohnsonT2 2.3 (1)   1.0 (15)   0.3 (34)   0.7 (24)  
Andrew LandryT2 0.4 (31)   1.0 (15)   0.8 (22)   2.1 (3)  
Lee WestwoodT4 1.1 (13)   1.1 (13)   1.4 (4)   0.4 (36)  
Daniel SummerhaysT4 0.1 (42)   1.6 (6)   0.9 (19)   1.4 (12)  
Branden Grace6 0.6 (24)   0.4 (36)   1.0 (11)   1.6 (8)  
Sergio GarciaT7 1.4 (6)  -0.4 (60)   1.8 (2)   0.5 (30)  
Scott PiercyT7 1.1 (13)   0.9 (18)   1.3 (6)   0.0 (44)  
Zach JohnsonT9 0.3 (34)   0.2 (42)   0.7 (25)   1.8 (7)  
Jason DayT9 1.2 (9)   0.0 (47)   1.4 (4)   0.4 (36)  
Bryson DeChambeauT9 0.4 (31)   0.5 (35)   0.8 (22)   1.3 (13)  
      
 TotalDriveApprShortPutt
Top 11 average3.80.90.61.11.1

  

Mark Broadie is a Columbia Business School professor who developed the strokes-gained statistic to compare each player’s performance against the rest of the field.